Become A Better Person, pt. 5: Movie Magic Within A Scene

Sometimes, film makers succeed in creating a perfect symbiosis between the images and the sound, between the visuals and the music. In an almost magical way, a thrilling harmony unfolds itself onto the white screen. These moments engrave themselves into the viewer’s mind, and will stay with him/her for a very long time.

To let you, my dear reader, become a better person, I’d like to show you some examples of modern day film magic, the perfect unison of what you see and what you hear. Prepare to be overthrown and illuminated.

The famous “Flying Statue” scene from Wolfgang Becker’s Goodbye Lenin! (2003):

After a coma, a deeply socialist mother returns to her home and children, not knowing that the Berlin Wall and the DDR have collapsed. Her children recreate the old situation in her bedroom, to prevent any possible arousal, but one day, mother decides to go out. Then she gets confronted, for the first time, with the new reunited situation Germany’s in.

The train robbery scene from Andrew Dominik’s The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007):

Jesse James and his gang make up to rob a train. Just see not only the amazing visuals by Roger Deakins, but mostly the thrilling combination of the images, Nick Cave and Warren Ellis’s music and the precise sound design.

The dance scene from François Ozon’s 5 x 2 (Cinq Fois Deux, or Five Times Two, 2004):

After a quarrel over dinner between the two lovers, the woman, the man, his brother and his brother’s boyfriend start to dance on the tones of Paolo Conte’s “Sparring Partner”. Nothing is said, everything is implied.

To conclude: the dazzling sequence of Laura’s murder in Tom Tykwer’s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (2006):

Richis and his daughter Laura fleed from Grasse to an isolated pension, because father Richis is convinced the Grasse murderer will kill his daughter to. Murderer Jean-Baptiste Grenouille travels secretly after them and finally finds the Richis family. The brilliant music is also by great artist Tom Tykwer.

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