Category Archives: (Other) Art and Media

Kid With A Movie Camera – In New York

The new blog is on its way – really! But hereby finally a couple of the short films I’ve directed at Columbia up until now. In chronological order – I hope that’s visible :) I’d love to hear what you think! (NB: the final six-minute project of my first semester, Day, is still in the making, expected release: Feb 26th :D)

Love,

Jordi

Joseph Auerbach

October 2010 – 03:36

Holy

November 2010 – 04:39

Channel 6 – Breaking News!

December 2010 – 03:32

corinne

January 2011 – 01:38

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A Week at Columbia: “cut/action”

Liz Agate and me in our Orientation Week masterpiece =)

This is the result of an on-the-fly shoot during the 2010 Orientation Week of Columbia’s MFA Film Program: the behind-the-scenes of a movie we never shot… And yes, it contains bicycles and sex scenes. Although we weren’t allowed to use that. So. Thanks to my great classmates and all the laughter and praise at the screening! :)

This is the result of an on-the-fly shoot during the 2010 Orientation Week of Columbia’s MFA Film Program: the behind-the-scenes of a movie we never shot… And yes, it contains bicycles and sex scenes. Although we weren’t allowed to use that. So.
Thanks to my great classmates and all the laughter and praise at the screening! :)

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Two or Three Cents (2): Hudson Warehouse’s “Romeo and Juliet” (2010)

Amanda Ochoa (Juliet), Valerie O'Hara (Nurse) and Amanda Renne Baker (Lady Capulet) in the Hudson Warehouse's "Romeo and Juliet".

They laid their scene not in fair Verona, but on the fair steps of the Soldier’s Patio in New York’s Riverside Park. Here, at the junction of 89th Street and Riverside Drive, the Hudson Warehouse – “that other free Shakespeare in the Park” – played their version of the Bard’s story “of no more woe than that of Juliet and her Romeo” against the backdrop of a setting sun, loud traffic and the occasional lost pedestrian. The audience was seated on the not-too-comfortable steps of the monument, and the location, though visually mesmerizing, placed the actors and the audience for a great challenge of (in)audibility. Yet, the Hudson Warehouse managed to create a performance that actually did overcome the shortcomings of open-air and urban theater. The first half an hour made one suspect to have found yet another proof that Americans just can’t do Shakespeare. Then, fortunately, Friar Lawrence stepped on stage, rendered as a fierce American army general in the tradition of Full Metal Jacket‘s R. Lee Ermey. From this point on, the directorial choices – the classic tale had been placed in the modern context of native Afghani versus American soldiers – started to make actual sense, after a first act of amateurish combat fights, inaudible actors and an unlucky jumble of costumes. Now, all the elements seemed to fall into place. Friar Lawrence, played by a spot-on Kelly King, managed to bridge the gap between ancient English speech and a modern-day context. The concept of weeping women – most notably by a truly hilarious performance of Valerie O’Hara as the Nurse – fitted perfectly in the suggested Islamic culture. Amanda Ochoa proved an intense and unexpectedly independent Juliet, rather neatly matched by George K. Wells, utterly believable in Romeo’s more vulnerable moments. The only things that still managed to hamper the performance were the torturing audience “seats”, a rather misplaced rendering of Mercutio by Tyler D. Hall and an uninteresting Prince (Jesse Michael Mothershed), and a sagging mid piece. Fortunately, these flaws diminished to a great extent by the play’s ferocious and gripping final scenes. As the passion of these star-crossed lovers slowly faded away on the steps of the Soldier’s Patio, one came to realize that some Americans actually are capable of delivering the Bard’s.

Amanda Ochoa and George K. Wells as the star-crossed lovers, J.C. and R.M.

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“Fietsende toeristen zijn verschrikkelijk”

Een straatinterview. Ik ben er altijd wel een voorstander van. Afgelopen maandag werd ik door journaliste Mariska van der Steege op straat aangesproken over mijn grootste frustratie (al kon zij dat niet weten): fietsende toeristen. Hieronder het geslaagde (al zeg ik het zelf) eindresultaat van ons gesprek. Continue reading

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GREAT NEWS!

Starting this Fall in the world's greatest city, at one of the most prestigious universities on the globe! Cheers! =D

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Mensen, woorden, en films van betekenis: Movies That Matter 2010

Opnieuw barst het applaus los. Het is anders dan het applaus dat ik van andere festivals gewend ben. Wanneer een mens begint te applaudisseren, voelt hij of zij wanneer het gepast is om te stoppen. Het publiek van de openingsavond van het Movies That Matter-filmfestival 2010 passeert dat moment keer op keer. De mensen die hier in de spotlights staan te vertellen, verdienen dat applaus namelijk echt. Het zijn de mensen die vanuit de verstikkende samenlevingen van landen als Cambodja en Iran vechten voor de rechten die wij Nederlanders als vanzelfsprekend ervaren. Het zijn de door principes gedreven mensen die hier, in ons land, zich inspannen om die mensen daar hun leven naar eigen inzicht te laten leven. “As long as there is injustice in the world, there will also be Amnesty.” Continue reading

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Happy Spielberg Day!

Okay - I know this blog's slowly becoming a birthday calendar, but how could I forget the birthday of the most influential and successful director alive?! The great Mr. Spielberg, whose contributions to film history are endless, has turned 63 today, but keeps on making movies the way he always made them: wearing his jeans, his glasses, his beard, and of course a baseball cap of his previous film. We salute you, Steve!

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